Immigration News: June 29, 2022

Broken Heart by Suzanne Schroeder
Broken Heart by Suzanne Schroeder, published under Creative Commons license

The quote of the day comes from Aaron Reichlin-Melnick of the American Immigration Council:

[PBS] “No person gets in a crowded truck and puts their life at risk if the border is open.

“The reality is, is that, for the migrants who are in that truck, there was no way for them to come into the United States legally, even if they were attempting to seek asylum. Since March of 2020, the ports of entry have been shut to asylum seekers. And for migrants from Mexico and the Northern Triangle countries, there really is no way right now to access the asylum process or indeed to migrate legally.

“The reality is, the vast majority of people who come to our border and seek a better life have no legal ways to enter. And over the last 30 years, we have made the border harder and harder to cross in the safe locations, which has driven people into more and more dangerous routes; 2021 was the deadliest year on record at the border.”

Children make up a growing percentage of undocumented immigrants arrested at the border. A TRAC report gives the data, including:

[ImmProf Blog] “In FY 2011, Border Patrol apprehended 23,089 total children. In FY 2021, that number was 293,218. …

“The proportion of unaccompanied children alone rose from one percent of all Title 8 apprehensions in FY 2008 to 9 percent in FY 2019.

“Recent numbers of border apprehensions remain lower than the early 1950s and the 1990s, especially when apprehensions relative to the country’s population are taken into account.

“Beginning largely in FY 2019 there has been a sharp increase from other countries including Brazil, Ecuador and Nicaragua, with some growth from Venezuela, Cuba, Chile, and Haiti, as well as Romania and, for a time, India.”

And in other news

California is the first state to make health care coverage available to all undocumented immigrants, regardless of age.

[Sacramento Bee] “Gov. Gavin Newsom late Sunday announced a budget deal he struck with the Legislature included a new Medi-Cal expansion that would cover more undocumented adults. 

“The program’s launch, starting no later than Jan. 1, 2024, is expected to provide full coverage for approximately 700,000 undocumented residents ages 26-49 and lead to the largest drop in the rate of uninsured Californians in a decade. …

“he state already allows many undocumented residents to join Medi-Cal. In 2015, California began allowing undocumented children to join Medi-Cal. Four years later, eligibility broadened to those younger than 26. And in May, the state started covering people aged 50 and over.”

On May 5, Dal Keun Lee, a 70-year-old Korean immigrant, was sitting in his van outside the laundromat he owned. A man came up behind him, stabbed him, and killed him. 

[Los Angeles Times] “To Cathy Lee, 40, her father’s killing was so random and vicious that it at first seemed like some bizarre nightmare too outrageous to be real. …

“She later learned that the suspect in her dad’s killing had allegedly committed a similar attack on another Asian victim just days before. And she realized her father’s death was reflective of troubling patterns of crime and victimization that have been redefining reality for many L.A. residents in recent years, including in the Asian community.”

About Mary Turck

News Day, written by Mary Turck, analyzes, summarizes, links to, and comments on reports from news media around the world, with particular attention to immigration, education, and journalism. Fragments, also written by Mary Turck, has fiction, poetry and some creative non-fiction. Mary Turck edited TC Daily Planet, www.tcdailyplanet.net, from 2007-2014, and edited the award-winning Connection to the Americas and AMERICAS.ORG, in its pre-2008 version. She is also a recovering attorney and the author of many books for young people (and a few for adults), mostly focusing on historical and social issues.
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