Latest links and stories: February 17, 2017

I collect immigration news on a Flipboard magazine. Since I can’t yet embed that magazine on my blog, I’m trying to post some of the latest links each weekday morning.

Supreme Court to set guidelines for Trump treatment of noncitizens (Reuters, 2/17/2017) Bad headline, but important story: “The three cases, which reached the court before Democratic President Barack Obama left office, all deal broadly with the degree to which non-citizens can assert rights under the U.S. Constitution.”

Several Hispanic Dems denied entrance to meeting with ICE (The Hill, 2/16/2017) Reps. Luis Gutiérrez (D-Ill.) and Norma Torres (D-Calif.) were told by a Paul Ryan aideto leave the room where House members met with ICE acting director Tom Homan, and other Congressional Hispanic Caucus members were not allowed to enter. Only two CHC members were allowed in the meeting.

“It was hard to not leave that meeting and believe that the Trump administration is going to target as many immigrants as possible,” [CHC chair Raul] Castro said. “The only hesitation they seemed to have was whether they would go after DACA recipients.” …

Pelosi said the way the administration handled the meeting — first postponing Tuesday’s gathering with the CHC, then refusing participation by certain Hispanic lawmakers — was “highly unusual.”

“I’ve never seen anything like it,” she said. “And hopefully never [will] again.”

Latest Real ID debate focuses on immigrant licenses (MPR, 2/16/2017) Some good news? While MN House Republicans included a ban on immigrant driver licenses in their version of the Real ID legislation, Sen. Eric Pratt (R-Prior Lake) “adjusted the language in his bill that was causing concern. Pratt said the bill was not meant to address the immigrant issue.” Both bills will eventually end up in conference committee – the House bill is ready for a floor vote and the Senate bill’s next stop is the Finance Committee.

10 Resign from President’s Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (NBC, 2/15/2017) The resignations make a total of 16 out of 20 committee members who have resigned since Trump’s inauguration, including the chair and vice-chair. Their letter to Trump protested his “portrayal of immigrants, refugees, people of color and people of various faiths as untrustworthy, threatening, and a drain on our nation.”

Migrants choose arrest in Canada over staying in U.S. (NPR, 2/17/2017) “Royal Canadian Mounted Police are reporting a flurry of illegal crossings into Canada in recent months. Officials say Quebec province has seen the highest influx of people seeking asylum, with many crossing in snowy, remote areas in northern New York.”

Federal immigration raids net many without criminal records, sowing fear (Washington Post, 2/17/2017)

100-plus Twin Cities businesses shut down, stand in solidarity with immigrants (Star Tribune, 2/17/2017)

A second DACA recipient has been detained by ICE (Fusion, 2/16/2017) This time, the DACA recipient is a 19-year-old San Antonio student, seized by ICE February 15 after he posted bail on a charge of possession of a small amount of marijuana.

Trump Administration Signals Shift In Policy On DACA (NPR, 2/16/2017) NPR interview with Tom Wong, political science prof at UC-San Diego, about shift to harsher policy. (audio only)

Trump says he’ll issue a new executive order on immigration by next week (Washington Post, 2/16/2017) Anybody’s guess what that means.

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About Mary Turck

News Day, written by Mary Turck, analyzes, summarizes, links to, and comments on reports from news media around the world, with particular attention to immigration, education, and journalism. Fragments, also written by Mary Turck, has fiction, poetry and some creative non-fiction. Mary Turck edited TC Daily Planet, www.tcdailyplanet.net, from 2007-2014, and edited the award-winning Connection to the Americas and AMERICAS.ORG, in its pre-2008 version. She is also a recovering attorney and the author of many books for young people (and a few for adults), mostly focusing on historical and social issues.
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